TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY, A BOON TO CHRONIC ARTHRITIS PATIENTS

TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY, A BOON TO CHRONIC ARTHRITIS PATIENTS

Hip replacement surgery, or arthroplasty, is the most-advanced procedure performed to get rid of chronic hip pain from arthritis or an injury. It is usually recommended for cases where general medication and other types of treatments fail to deliver intended results. Total Hip Replacement surgery can permanently alleviate pain and improve your ability to get around.

The total hip replacement is performed in a highly sterile operating room with a special laminar airflow system, which helps reduce the chances of infection. The arthritic ball and socket are then exposed and the bone is prepared to receive the artificial hip joint, and then the prosthesis is inserted. During the closure, two drains may be inserted around the operated area to assist for blood evacuation. The entire operation will take from 1 to 2 hours.

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

  • Persistent pain, despite pain killers
  • Pain that gets worsen with walking
  • Disturbed sleep
  • Makes it difficult to get dressed
  • Affects your ability to go up or down stairs
  • Makes it difficult to rise from a seated position

PRE-OPERATIVE ORIENTATION

Some patients will be asked to donate a pint of their own blood in the weeks preceding their hip replacement surgery. This addresses the need for blood transfusion during the surgery. Almost all of the patients will receive this donated blood as a transfusion post-surgery. A thorough medical examination is conducted as a precaution to ensure that a patient is healthy enough to undergo this surgical procedure. Additional tests to examine patient’s heart and lungs are carried out.

POST-OPERATIVE COURSE

After spending time in the recovery room to heal; most patients go back to their rooms, once the sensation returns to the legs. A pain pump is connected to the epidural catheter which will allow the patient to control pain medicine. Most people are quite comfortable with the pain pump in place. The first day after surgery will have an active schedule focussed on patient’s agility.

Physiotherapists advice upon the need to perform few exercises, while in bed and take dedicated care in helping the patient to stand up and take few baby steps with the help of the walker. A short-term placement in a rehabilitation facility may be suggested, depending upon the patient’s age and other factors. Otherwise, he / she will be discharged home with rigorous physio-therapy in place.

Dr. Neelam Ramana Reddy

MBBS, MS, MCH
Consultant Orthopedician & Joint Replacement Surgeon

Star Hospitals

For Appointments, Call: 040 44 77 77 00